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No honor: You can’t trust cybercriminals any more

hackerOnce upon a time, goes the story, there was honor between thieves and victims. They held a member of your family for ransom; you paid the ransom; they left you alone. The local mob boss demanded protection money; if you didn’t pay, your business burned down, but if you did pay and didn’t rat him out to the police, his and his gang honestly tried to protect you. And hackers may have been operating outside legal boundaries, but for the most part, they were explorers and do-gooders intending to shine a bright light on the darkness of the Internet – not vandals, miscreants, hooligans and ne’er-do-wells.

That’s not true any more, perhaps. As I write in IT Pro Portal, “Faceless and faithless: A true depiction of today’s cyber-criminals?

Not that long ago, hackers emerged as modern-day Robin Hoods, digital heroes who relentlessly uncovered weaknesses in applications and networks to reveal the dangers of using technology carelessly. They are curious, provocative; love to know how things work and how they can be improved.

Today, however, there is blight on their good name. Hackers have been maligned by those who do not have our best interests at heart, but are instead motivated by money – attackers who steal our assets and hold organisations such as banks and hospitals to ransom.

(My apologies for the British spelling – it’s a British website and they’re funny that way.)

It’s hard to lose faith in hackers, but perhaps we need to. Sure, not all are cybercriminals, but with the rise of ransomware, nasty action by state actors, and some pretty nasty attacks like the new single-pixel malvertising exploit written up yesterday by Dan Goodwin in Ars Technica (which was discovered out after I wrote this story), it’s hard to trust that most hackers secretly have our best interests at heart.

This reminds me of Ranscam. In a blog post, “When Paying Out Doesn’t Pay Off,” Talos reports that:

Ranscam is one of these new ransomware variants. It lacks complexity and also tries to use various scare tactics to entice the user to paying, one such method used by Ranscam is to inform the user they will delete their files during every unverified payment click, which turns out to be a lie. There is no longer honor amongst thieves. Similar to threats like AnonPop, Ranscam simply delete victims’ files, and provides yet another example of why threat actors cannot always be trusted to recover a victim’s files, even if the victim complies with the ransomware author’s demands. With some organizations likely choosing to pay the ransomware author following an infection,  Ranscam further justifies the importance of ensuring that you have a sound, offline backup strategy in place rather than a sound ransom payout strategy. Not only does having a good backup strategy in place help ensure that systems can be restored, it also ensures that attackers are no longer able to collect revenue that they can then reinvest into the future development of their criminal enterprise.

Scary — and it shows that often, crime does pay. No honor among thieves indeed.

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