Entries by Alan Zeichick

Borland’s Core Dump

Borland has a new application life cycle management strategy. The company, which has been undergoing a radical shift since the departure of CEO Dale Fuller last November, is moving away from its role-based Core SDP ALM solution. Instead, the company is releasing a new line of tools which are more function-based, called LQM. This strategy […]

Hewlett and Packard

The ongoing drama at Hewlett-Packard has me rapt with attention. Beyond its involvement with Mercury (which HP is in the process of buying), the corporate-spying scandal doesn’t have much immediately relevance to my own world of software development. However, it is a fascinating tale, and it’s interesting to watch it unfold. Certainly friends who work […]

Feed me!

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, and I’m at that stage of my nascent blogging career. Two friends, upon hearing about my blog, suggested that I add a link to its XML feed to the blog page. Sounds easy, I thought. The software supports syndication feeds, and there’s a convenient CSS stylesheet. How hard […]

Zilog enters the 16-bit market. Again.

My first exposure to microprocessors came through the use of the Zilog Z80 chip. It was hard to do any work with small computers in the late 1970s and NOT use the eight-bit Z80; they were relative cheap, easy to build circuits with, and simple to program. Many hardware and software engineers, including myself, cut […]

The Itanium Solutions Alliance…

Tomorrow I’m heading up to San Francisco for the second day of the Intel Developer Forum. I’ve received many meeting invitations for IDF, but have been struck by the paucity of news or announcements that would apply to software developers. The bulk of the third-party announcements have focused on storage and wireless networking. As Intel […]

Cyberfortress vs. low-hanging fruit

My 9/21/06 “Zeichick’s Take” about automotive security brought several letters-to-the-editor, one of which made an excellent point that applies well in the physical security world, but which in my opinion falls down in cybersecurity. Steve Brewin wrote, “Apparently the vast majority of crime is committed by amateurs chancing on an easy opportunity. The simple lock […]

2007 editorial calendars are up!

(Cue the trumpet sound effects) The 2007 editorial calendars for SD Times and Software Test & Performance are now avialable. For those of you who don’t follow such things, a magazine or newspaper’s editorial calendar provides insight into some of the feature articles that the publication will cover during the next year. It’s traditional for […]

Eclipse bugs resolve later…or never

One of the challenges for any software development project — whether enterprise or for-sale, open source or not — is what to do about all those pesky defects that nobody’s going to fix. Why aren’t they going to be fixed? It might be that they’re not a show-stopper, or that there are other priorities, or […]

Goodbye, Patricia

The HP spying investigation is getting stranger by the day. When the company reported that its chairwoman, Patricia Dunn, was going to step down as of January, many of us knew that wouldn’t hold — she had to go, and she had to go now. Only a few days later, after more revelations, she resigned […]