It’s all about the tradeoffs! You can have the chicken or the fish, but not both. You can have the big engine in your new car, but that means a stick shift—you can’t have the V8 and an automatic. Same for that cake you want to have and eat. Your business applications can be easy to use or secure—not both.

But some of those are false dichotomies, especially when it comes to security for data center and cloud applications. You can have it both ways. The systems can be easy to use and maintain, and they can be secure.

On the consumer side, consider two-factor authentication (2FA), whereby users receive a code number, often by text message to their phones, which they must type into a webpage to confirm their identity. There’s no doubt that 2FA makes systems more secure. The problem is that 2FA is a nuisance for the individual end user, because it slows down access to a desired resource or application. Unless you’re protecting your personal bank account, there’s little incentive for you to use 2FA. Thus, services that require 2FA frequently aren’t used, get phased out, are subverted, or are simply loathed.

Likewise, security measures specified by corporate policies can be seen as a nuisance or an impediment. Consider dividing an enterprise network into small “trusted” networks, such as by using virtual LANs or other forms of authenticating users, applications, or API calls. This setup can require considerable effort for internal developers to create, and even more effort to modify or update.

When IT decides to migrate an application from a data center to the cloud, the steps required to create API-level authentication across such a hybrid deployment can be substantial. The effort required to debug that security scheme can be horrific. As for audits to ensure adherence to the policy? Forget it. How about we just bypass it, or change the policy instead?

Multiply that simple scenario by 1,000 for all the interlinked applications and users at a typical midsize company. Or 10,000 or 100,000 at big ones. That’s why post-mortem examinations of so many security breaches show what appears to be an obvious lack of “basic” security. However, my guess is that in many of those incidents, the chief information security officer or IT staffers were under pressure to make systems, including applications and data sources, extremely easy for employees to access, and there was no appetite for creating, maintaining, and enforcing strong security measures.

Read more about these tradeoffs in my article on Forbes for Oracle Voice: “You Can Have Your Security Cake And Eat It, Too.”

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