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The same coding bugs cause the same security vulnerabilities, year after year

Software developers and testers must be sick of hearing security nuts rant, “Beware SQL injection! Monitor for cross-site scripting! Watch for hijacked session credentials!” I suspect the developers tune us out. Why? Because we’ve been raving about the same defects for most of their careers. Truth is, though, the same set of major security vulnerabilities persists year after year, decade after decade.

The industry has generated newer tools, better testing suites, Agile methodologies, and other advances in writing and testing software. Despite all that, coders keep making the same dumb mistakes, peer reviews keep missing those mistakes, test tools fail to catch those mistakes, and hackers keep finding ways to exploit those mistakes.

One way to see the repeat offenders is to look at the OWASP Top 10. That’s a sometimes controversial ranking of the 10 primary vulnerabilities, published every three or four years by the Open Web Application Security Project.

The OWASP Top 10 list is not controversial because it’s flawed. Rather, some believe that the list is too limited. By focusing only on the top 10 web code vulnerabilities, they assert, it causes neglect for the long tail. What’s more, there’s often jockeying in the OWASP community about the Top 10 ranking and whether the 11th or 12th belong in the list instead of something else. There’s merit to those arguments, but for now, the OWASP Top 10 is an excellent common ground for discussing security-aware coding and testing practices.

Note that the top 10 list doesn’t directly represent the 10 most common attacks. Rather, it’s a ranking of risk. There are four factors used for this calculation. One is the likelihood that applications would have specific vulnerabilities; that’s based on data provided by companies. That’s the only “hard” metric in the OWASP Top 10. The other three risk factors are based on professional judgement.

It boggles the mind that a majority of top 10 issues appear across the 2007, 2010, 2013, and draft 2017 OWASP lists. That doesn’t mean that these application security vulnerabilities have to remain on your organization’s list of top problems, though—you can swat those flaws.

Read more in my essay, “The OWASP Top 10 is killing me, and killing you!

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