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Streamlining the cybersecurity insurance application process

Have you ever suffered through the application process for cybersecurity insurance? You know that “suffered” is the right word because of a triple whammy.

  • First, the general risk factors involved in cybersecurity are constantly changing. Consider the rapid rise in ransomware, for example.
  • Second, it is extremely labor-intensive for businesses to document how “safe” they are, in terms of their security maturity, policies, practices and technology.
  • Third, it’s hard for insurers, the underwriters, and their actuaries, to feel confident that they truly understand how risky a potential customer can be — information and knowledge that’s required for quoting a policy that offers sufficient coverage at reasonable rates.

That is, of course, assuming that everyone is on the same page and agrees that cybersecurity insurance is important to consider for the organization. Is cybersecurity insurance a necessary evil for every company to consider? Or, is it only a viable option for a small few? That’s a topic for a separate conversation. For now, let’s assume that you’re applying for insurance.

From their part, insurance carriers aren’t equipped to go into your business and examine your IT infrastructure. They won’t examine firewall settings or audit your employee anti-phishing training materials. Instead, they rely upon your answers to questionnaires developed and interpreted by their own engineers. Unfortunately, those questionnaires may not get into the nuances, especially if you’re in a vertical where the risks are especially high, and so are the rewards for successful hackers.

According to InformationAge, 77% of ransomware appear in four industries. Those are business & professional services (28%), government (19%), healthcare (15%) and retail (15%). In 2016 and 2017, healthcare organizations like hospitals and medical practices were repeatedly hit by ransomware. Give that data to the actuaries, and they might look for those types of organizations to fill out even more questionnaires.

About those questionnaires? “Applications tend to have a lot of yes/no answers… so that doesn’t give the entire picture of what the IT framework actually looks like,” says Michelle Chia, Vice President, Zurich North America. She explained that an insurance company’s internal assessment engineers have to dig deeper to understand what is really going on: “They interview the more complex clients to get a robust picture of what the combination of processes and controls actually looks like and how secure the network and the IT infrastructure are.”

Read more in my latest for ITSP Magazine, “How to Streamline the Cybersecurity Insurance Process.”

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