Web filtering. The phrase connotes keeping employees from spending too much time monitoring Beanie Baby auctions on eBay, and stopping school children from encountering (accidentally or deliberately) naughty images on the internet. Were it that simple — but nowadays, web filtering goes far beyond monitoring staff productivity and maintaining the innocence of childhood. For nearly every organization today, web filtering should be considered an absolute necessity. Small business, K-12 school district, Fortune 500, non-profit or government… it doesn’t matter. The unfiltered internet is not your friend, and legally, it’s a liability; a lawsuit waiting to happen.

Web filtering means blocking internet applications – including browsers – from contacting or retrieving content from websites that violate an Acceptable Use Policy (AUP). The policy might set rules blocking some specific websites (like a competitor’s website). It might block some types of content (like pornography), or detected malware, or even access to external email systems via browser or dedicated clients. In some cases, the AUP might include what we might call government-mandated restrictions (like certain websites in hostile countries, or specific news sources).

Unacceptable use in the AUP

The specifics of the AUP might be up to the organization to define entirely on its own; that would be the case for a small business, perhaps. Government organizations, such as schools or military contractors, might have specific AUP requirements placed on them by funders or government regulators, thereby becoming a compliance/governance issue as well. And of course, legal counsel should be sought when creating policies that balance an employee’s ability to access content of his/her choice, against the company’s obligations to protect the employee (or the company) from unwanted content.

It sounds easy – the organization sets an AUP, consulting legal, IT and the executive suite. The IT department implements the AUP through web filtering, perhaps with software installed and configured on devices; perhaps through firewall settings at the network level; and perhaps through filters managed by the internet service provider. It’s not simple, however. The internet is constantly changing, employees are adept at finding ways around web filters; and besides, it’s tricky to translate policies written in English (as in the legal policy document) into technological actions. We’ll get into that a bit more shortly. First, let’s look more closely at why organizations need those Acceptable Use Policies, and what should be in them.

  • Improving employee productivity. This is the low-hanging fruit. You may not want employees spending too much time on Facebook on their company computers. (Of course, if they are permitted to bring mobile devices into the office, they can still access social media via cellular). That’s a policy consideration, though the jury is out if a blank blockage is the best way to improve productivity.
  • Preserving bandwidth. For technical reasons, you may not want employees streaming Netflix movies or Hulu-hosted classic TV shows across the business network. Seinfeld is fun, but not on company bandwidth. As with social media, this is truly up to the organization to decide.
  • Blocking email access. Many organizations do not want their employees accessing external email services from the business computers. That’s not only for productivity purposes, but also makes it difficult to engage in unapproved communications – such as emailing confidential documents to yourself. Merely configuring your corporate email server to block the exfiltration of intellectual property is not enough if users can access personal gmail.com or hushmail.com accounts. Blocking external email requires filtering multiple protocols as well as specific email hosts, and may be required to protect not only your IP, but also customers’ data, in addition to complying with regulations from organizations like the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.
  • Blocking access to pornography and NSFW content. It’s not that you are being a stick-in-the-mud prude, or protecting children. The initial NSFW (not safe for work) are often said as a joke, but in reality, some content can be construed as contributing to an hostile work environment. Just like the need to maintain a physically safe work environment – no blocked fire exits, for example – so too must you maintain a safe internet environment. If users can be unwillingly subjected to offensive content by other employees, there may be significant legal, financial and even public-relations consequences if it’s seen as harassment.
  • Blocking access to malware. A senior manager receives a spear-phishing email that looks legit. He clicks the link and, wham; ransomware is on his computer. Or spyware, like a keylogger. Or perhaps a back-door that allows other access by hackers. You can train employees over and over, and they will still click on unsafe email links or on web pages. Anti-malware software on the computer can help, but web filtering is part of a layered approach to anti-malware protection. This applies to trackers as well: As part of the AUP, the web filters may be configured to block ad networks, behavior trackers and other web services that attempt to glean information about your company and its workers.
  • Blocking access to specific internet applications. Whether you consider it Shadow IT or simply an individual’s personal preference, it’s up to an AUP to decide which online services should be accessible; either through an installed application or via a web interface. Think about online storage repositories such as Microsoft OneDrive, Google Drive, Dropbox or Box: Personal accounts can be high-bandwidth conduits for exfiltration of vast quantities of valuable IP. Web filtering can help manage the situation.
  • Compliance with government regulations. Whether it’s a military base commander making a ruling, or a government restricting access to news sites out-of-favor with the current regime; those are rules that often must be followed without question. It’s not my purpose here to discuss whether this is “censorship,” though in some cases it certainly is. However, the laws of the United States do not apply outside the United States, and blocking some internet sites or types of web content may be part of the requirements for doing business in some countries or with some governments. What’s important here is to ensure that you have effective controls and technology in place to implement the AUP – but don’t go broadly beyond it.
  • Compliance with industry requirements. Let’s use the example of the requirements that schools or public libraries must protect students (and the general public) from content deemed to be unacceptable in that environment. After all, just because a patron is an adult doesn’t mean he/she is allowed to watch pornography on one of the library’s publicly accessible computers, or even on his/her computer on the library’s Wi-Fi network.

What about children?

A key ingredient in creating an AUP for schools and libraries in the United States is the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA). In order to receive government subsidies or discounts, schools and libraries must comply with these regulations. (Other countries may have an equivalent to these policies.)

Learn more about how the CIPA should drive the AUP for any organization where minors can be found, and how best to implement an AUP for secure protection. That’s all covered in my article for Upgrade Magazine, “Web filtering for business: Keep your secrets safe, and keep your employees happy.”

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